Basil
The king of herbs

This ‘king of herbs’ gets its name from Greek meaning royal or kingly plant which makes sense since basil certainly plays king in many Italian dishes. The primary ingredient in pesto and the easiest plant to keep alive on your windowsill, basil is a must-have.

Our variety of sweet basil is what you think of when you hear your friend proudly talking about her herb garden. A perfect garnish on basically any dish, basil is best known combined with garlic, oil and pine nuts for a five-minute Italian pesto recipe. To really impress your Italian Nonna, talk about how you love the smell of basil, which combines hints of anise, pepper and mint that you can’t live without on her homemade ravioli.

Cilantro
The famous debate

The famous cilantro debate, you either love its fresh lemon-like flavor or hate its soapy taste. Did you know that’s a genetic trait? If you’re on the love side of the debate, take cilantro, also known as coriander, and consider adding it to your favorite dish. Aside from taste, the benefits range from helping with skin inflammation to anemia and high cholesterol. With cilantro’s first introduction to North America in 1670, it’s been a favorite addition to recipes since.

For a crowd pleaser try adding rice, salt, cilantro, lime juice, and olive oil for a great cilantro-lime rice that would make Martha Stewart proud. Or just pick it fresh and garnish cooked shrimp, chicken or salad and your friends will still be impressed. Unless they think it tastes like soap, avoid those friends.

Mint
Fresh and cool

If you want to impress your friends next time you’re wiping up a batch of mojitos, let them know there are about 13-18 species of mint with a sub cosmopolitan distribution across Europe, Asia, Australia and North America. Or just add this refreshing herb to a mint julep and call it a day.

One of the most commonly known herbs, this familiar taste will leave your mouth fresh and cool. Have you ever tried mint and lime sorbet? You should. As a main flavor component in teas, jellies, syrups, candies and ice creams, this is definitely a flavor you’re familiar with

Thyme
Source of courage

In the mint family, and a relative of oregano, thyme has a slightly minty flavor with more piney, smokey tones and is used best in seasoning blends and sauces and is used as much for its smell as its taste. Commonly used in meat dishes and paired with basil, oregano, sage, rosemary or garlic, thyme does not like to stand alone, although in ancient Greece it was burnt as incense in temples as a source of courage.

Did you know? Thyme is usually sold as bunches of sprigs. A sprig is one stem of the plant with leaves and depending on the dish, the whole sprig can be used or just the leaves should be removed from the stem. When a recipe calls for a bunch/sprig it means with the stem but if the recipe says spoons it means just the leaves.

Not as soft as its counterparts, this leafy lettuce stays true to its crisp name. A perfect addition to a mixed greens salad or on its own in a sandwich, crisp salad is versatile and nutritious. Grown as a stalk, you’ll be happy to have our crisp salad in your daily meals.

Unlike crisp salad, green leaf lettuce branches from a single stalk making it leafy and more perishable than lettuce that comes in a head. It is generally included in baby lettuce mixes and has a true green color and mild flavor. Since green leaf lettuce wilts quickly it is best to wait to add dressing until just before serving.

Red leaf lettuce branches from a single stalk making it more perishable than lettuce that comes in a head. It is generally included in baby lettuce mixes and has a deep red color at the top of the leaf and a mild flavor similar to green leaf lettuce. Since red leaf lettuce wilts quickly it is best to wait to add dressing until just before serving.

In a baby leaf mix you get light and dark green and red lettuces combining colors and textures with smooth and ruffled leaves. With our leaf mix you get fresh flavors in a ready-to-serve blend that is perfect served with your favorite dressing.